Sew Grateful and Vintage Wedding Dresses

“Sew Grateful Week” came and went and I was nowhere to be seen, but as always I am truly grateful for this wonderful online community of sewing bloggers, you guys have been such a wonderful source of continuity and creativity in my life, Thank You.  I know I didn’t have time to plan anything as I was out of town last weekend and busy with life the following week (lame excuse?) but maybe this post will make up for it.

This weekend I visited the exhibit “Tying the Knot – Cleveland Wedding Fashions, 1830- 1980” at the Western Reserve Historical Society in Cleveland. As you are fellow sewists you probably understand the thrill I get from looking at beautifully sewn things. It’s also a wonderful way for me to connect with the sewing history in my new hometown and look at some of the things that people right here used to love and wear. I thought I’d share a few of the pieces that really caught my eye (mostly from the 1900’s and onwards). If you’re in the area and you love sewing, check it out because the exhibit has been extended to March 31st, 2013.

First up is this luxurious golden dress from 1879, its creation is attributed to none other than Charles Frederick Worth, the founder of “Haute Couture”! No kidding once you see all the fine details on the dress:

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Here’s one that has a simple 1920’s flapper silhouette, but just as much shiny goodness. This one is interesting as it was meant to be used both as a wedding and a party dress:

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Just 10 years later,  1930’s wedding fashions changed dramatically and dresses like this gorgeous but reserved silk velvet one became more popular. Look at the train on this thing. I really love the delicate glass beading on the neckline:

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This next one is my favorite one, a delicate floaty number from the 1940’s with a sheer bolero and lovely sequin work:

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Also some pretty vintage underthings like this 1920’s camisole, robe and knickers set:

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You didn’t think I’d forget about the shoes and other important accessories did you?
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And last but not least, one for the guys, some vintage tuxedo vests that the men of Cleveland used to wear!

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In other important historical sewing news (is that an oxymoron?) I learned that the White Sewing Machine company was based out of Cleveland, Ohio. Isn’t that neat?

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I hope you enjoyed this little (limited) virtual visit! I hope you all had a wonderful “Sew Grateful Week”,

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New Beginnings

After a four month break I’m back and sewing again, and it feels so good. I had to take a break because…I got married!

Big news, I know and while I wanted to share the whole wedding process, I realized early on that  it would be overwhelming to do so many things at once. I had over a year to plan this wedding, but as the big day got closer, finding time to sew (let alone blog) was getting tricky and something had to give.

So here I am, with a brand spanking new machine (I really love it) and a sweet new sewing spot. Here’s to a future full of love and craft ❤

Cheers!

Techne Tou Biou: The Craft of Life

“We can return now to one of Plato’s expressions for care of the soul, techne tou biou, the craft of life. Care of the soul requires craft (techne) – skill, attention, and art. To live with a high degree of artfulness means to attend to the small things that keep the soul engaged in whatever we are doing, and it is the very heart of soul-making. From some grand overview of life, it may seem that only the big events are ultimately important. But to the soul, the most minute details and the most ordinary activities, carried out with mindfulness and art, have an effect far beyond their apparent insignificance.”

– Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul (1992)

All images property of Beautifully Sewn